InfraRed (LWIR) Imaging used for fever screening

Teledyne Dalsa Calibir LWIR camera

Long Wave Infra Red (LWIR) cameras have been used for industrial applications to detect infrared light in the 8-14um wavelength region. This infrared light is invisible radiant energy that we experience as heat but can not see.   Applications for LWIR cameras continues to expand past industrial applications now entering into medical markets such as fever screening.

Teledyne Dalsa has expanded the Calibir LWIR camera series introducing the latest Calibir GXM model now with radiometric capabilities. With outbreaks of infectious diseases such as Covid 19, LWIR cameras can be used for fever screening by detecting elevated skin temperatures. Using optics, the cameras provide the ability to take the temperature of individuals keeping save distances between patients and medical practitioners.

Click HERE for a quote on the Calibir GXM LWIR camera

All cameras are factory-calibrated for reliable radiometric performance, have outstanding dynamic range and allow the best possible NETD over a vast range of temperature (>600C). . Coupled with many features such as multiple ROI, color maps, LUTs and the ability to sync and trigger multiple cameras, makes the Calbir GXM a good solution for many thermal imaging applications.

Image threshold
Example: Thresholding with Look Up Table (LUT) allows the Calibir GXM to mark certain temperatures with color while leaving the rest in monochrome.

Download the full Application note from Teledyne Dalsa HERE: “Thermal Imaging technology for fever screening”

Full specifications on Teledyne Dalsa LWIR cameras can be found HERE

Watch this 1 minute overview video

1st Vision’s sales engineers have over 100 years of combined experience to assist in your camera selection.  With a large portfolio of lenses, cables, NIC card and industrial computers, we can provide a full vision solution!

Previous related blogs:

Learn about Thermal Imaging – Problems solved with Dalsa’s new LWIR Calibir camera!

1stVision acquired by Next Imaging

We are excited to announce that 1stVision has been acquired by Next Imaging as of February 7, 2020. We will be doing business as 1stVision, Inc. keeping our well-known presence in the imaging market for the foreseeable future and continuing to serve the North American Market at the highest level.  Industry veteran Mike Troiano [has joined us to expand our presence and knowledge.

Next Imaging also owns Image S SpA, the largest imaging distributor in Italy.  Next Imaging’s focus is to build a strategic platform for imaging distribution in the American and European markets.  Together we are the only distribution partner in the world to service both North America and Europe for many of our principals.  

We have helped deploy nearly 100 systems since early March for the detection of COVID-19 and for diagnostic systems to help patients recover.  Global suppliers have supported us with lead times in as short as 4 business days for products that normally take 4-8 weeks in our fight.  As the North American market’s largest supplier of imaging components, we have been sited by several of the world’s top healthcare organizations as a key partner and an essential supplier during this time.  We remain open for business Monday through Friday 8-4PM EST.

During the difficult time caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we look forward to a bright future supporting our existing and new customers for medical, industrial and emerging imaging applications.

1stVision’s team of experts have nearly 200 years of combined experience providing a high level of technical know-how.  With a large portfolio of cameras, lensescablesNIC cards and industrial computers, we can provide a full vision solution! Freel free to contact us for immediate technical assistnace HERE

Considerations for Color machine vision cameras using a Bayer filter – White paper

Bayer image
Dalsa Falcon camera

Users of single chip color machine vision cameras have lots of choices in camera features. The following are a few issues relating to these types of cameras that users need to be aware of when they are choosing their camera type.

First, its important to understand how a “single chip” machine vision color camera creates a color image. Thanks to Bryce Bayer of Eastman Kodak, we have the “Bayer” filter mosaic filter pattern that generates a color image through interpolation which is the technique used in most machine vision cameras today.

Bayer filter
Bayer Filter

From a macro view, using the Bayer filter, we collect light onto individual pixels through each of the red, green and blue filters which assigns intensity values. Using various interpolation methods, each pixel uses data from adjacent pixels to determine its color to generate a nice color image.

There are several considerations in color imaging during this process such as:
1 – Bayer conversion – Understanding this is important as it may effect the computer CPU load and image fidelity.
2 – Frame rates – Depending on the color format (ie. RGB vs Raw), you will need to understand how this effects the camera frame rate requirements and camera interfaces.
3 – Color formats – Depending if the application simply wants to identify a blue vs red part vs doing a more in depth color analysis will determine which color format is utilized.

1stVision has published a white paper addressing these considerations in the link below.

Download this comprehensive white paper – “Considerations for Color machine vision cameras using a Bayer filter. Click HERE.

For any color application, there is various color camera technology that needs to be considered first. 3-Chip Color machine vision cameras have advantages over Bayer color cameras in which color fidelity and resolution are superior. Additional resources on each aspect is below:

3 chip color camera block diagram
Block Diagram of 3 chip color camera – Courtesy of JAI

Color Fidelity – If your application requires high color fidelity and trying to detect small differences in color, 3 chip color cameras should be also considered. Learn more in this related blog HERE.

Resolution – Due to the interpolation in Bayer color cameras, the overall resolution is reduced significantly. In applications where resolution AND color are important, 3 chip color cameras provide these advantages. Comparison images and further explanation can be found in this blog HERE.

Click to contact
Give us some brief idea of your application and we will contact you to
discuss camera options.

1st Vision’s sales engineers have over 100 years of combined experience to assist in your camera selection.  With a large portfolio of lenses, cables, NIC card and industrial computers, we can provide a full vision solution!

Ph:  978-474-0044  /  info@1stvision.com  / www.1stvision.com

Related Blogs:

Which machine vision lens provide ultra-high resolution?

Moritex machine vision lens

The image fidelity achievable from a machine vision camera is only as good as the optics you use! Many of the machine vision cameras used today utilize very small pixels, down to 1.25um. The crispness of the images are a result of the resolution of your machine vision lens, so matching the right lens to the camera sensor is extremely important. We classify the lens resolution in terms of line pairs per millimeter (lp/mm). So, what lenses can help resolve these small pixels?

First, the relationship of pixel pitch can be put in terms of lp/mm as seen in the chart to the right. Machine vision lens manufacturers today typically provide the resolving power on their data sheets to help in the lens selection and ensure your matching the lens to the image sensor. If not matched properly, image contrast will suffer.

For machine vision cameras with small pixels, the Moritex ML-M-UR “Ultra high” resolution lenses are an excellent choice with the capability of resolving pixel pitches down to 2.2um with good contrast.

Click HERE for specifications on the Moritex ML-M-UR series and request a quote

The comparison images below show the Moritex ML-M-UR series compared to a conventional lens with less resolution. As you can see in the cutout of the corner, the contrast is much higher with lenses with high resolving power.

machine vision lenses  - image comparison
Left (High resolution lens) Right (Legacy lower resolution lens)

Lens resolution typically has fall off to the edges of a lens. To maintain high contrast, Moritex has optimized the ML-M-UR series to have good resolving power to the edges of the lens.

The charts below represent the contrast (MTF) corresponding to image height (x-axis ) showing the contrast from lens center to lens edge. The X-axis represents the center starting at zero millimeters and mapping MTF to the edge (furthest right point) The ML-M-UR shown in the left chart demonstrates very good performance across the lens. (A relatively flat line is good!) As a comparison to another lens (right chart), contrast is degraded across the lens from center to edge.

Moritex ML-M-UR MTF

Aside from high resolution, The Moritex ML-M-UR series are a compact, 29mm diameter design and well suited for typical 29mm cube cameras. Additionally the lenses have an anti-vibration design with maximum acceleration to 10G’s.

Click to contact
Give us some brief idea of your application and we will contact you to
discuss camera options.

1st Vision’s sales engineers have over 100 years of combined experience to assist in your camera selection.  With a large portfolio of lenses, cables, NIC card and industrial computers, we can provide a full vision solution!

Ph:  978-474-0044  /  info@1stvision.com  / www.1stvision.com

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